Sense of Place: that which surrounds us defines us

Placemaking

Regional Identity – balance between what people want from the land and what the land will give them

 

French cheeses, Swiss chocolates, German beers all have long standing names that stem from different people’s regional perspective, or twist, on the regional product

Just as cultural practices advanced for production of these products, the escalation in appreciation for the product led the society to remold its landscape for the production of these products

 

Placemaking

            Creation of space to represent cultural identity

Loss of appreciation for nature and local biodiversity in modern urban cities and regions is in direct correlation with the loss of pride in regional specialization that has resulted from mass production of goods and services

Knowing what is endemic or indigenous to a region brings a sense of regionalism 

 

                        “A SENSE OF PLACE” = the feel that a culture or group of people give a region

   Think about your travels to places that are different – what is it that makes them different?

 Direct impacts of place: on physical health, on opportunities, on lifestyle choices

 

A location is a combination of a place and its people

 GLOCLAIZATION

Appreciating biodiversity on a cultural level

Supporting local farmer’s markets

Development of urban allotment gardens

Increase in community supported agriculture (CSA) programs

AND enjoying IMPORTS because you KNOW they are IMPORTS

 

What does this mean for globalization?

– It encourages local societies to be sustainable to the extent that they can self provide for quality of life

– Appreciates the differences between places through imports of other region’s specialties/role their region plays in the global marketplace

– Properly planning for regional appreciation and increasing a sense of place are intrinsically linked

 

Globalization in many ways can be seen as an EXPORT OF CULTURE

 

            It used to mean that distance was everything – regions were created as a result of lack of transportation. All things are related and proximal things are more related. As transportation technology evolved, so too did the connections between people and regions. Telecommunications has sped up the rate of global interaction, and gives some non-proximal things similar characteristics/properties of proximal things.

 

 

 

Major Issues

1) American culture is homogenized – Does “Melting Pot” automatically mean “Bland?”

 

2) Leading” in a “race” toward development automatically insinuates that being developed is better.

  -what lessons are we missing that are only passed down through culture and experience?

3) The terms ‘old world’ and ‘new world’ are reflective of ignoring the history of the population before colonization. There were people and civilizations before the land was new to Europeans and their history.

     In essence, the terms ‘old’ world and ‘new’ world are insensitive to world history. Between these two societies, the Europeans were the ones to first invent the written word, and this is why their “history” is “older”

* for more colloquial lingo that alludes to inacurate depcition, don’t miss this TED talk on first and third world countries.

 

“A psychological place-specific approach, and not only an ecological site-specific approach, is indispensable to address the issue of urban sustainability,” (Bonnes, et al., 2007)

 

HOPEFULLY, BY NOW, YOU ALL CAN CLEARLY SEE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOCATION AND CULTURE. THE ARTICLE BY T. FREIDMAN WILL ITERATE THE IMPACTS GLOBALIZATION HAS HAD ON REGIONAL CULTURE. THE QUESTION TO YOU IS:

 “IS IT POSSIBLE TO MAINTAIN THE BENEFITS OF REGIONAL IDENTITY THROUGH FUTURE ERAS OF GLOBALZIATION?”

or is regionalism always akin to tribalism?

 

Bookmark the permalink.